Tag Archives: Eat

Final Project – Picking Up the Fork After you Pick Up the Weights: The Importance of a Healthy Diet

15 Dec

Sitting Down at the Table with Victoria Villalba

Victoria Villalba, a 21-year-old senior at Rowan University, is training to compete in a Physique Competition in Baltimore Maryland April 13, 2013. Villalba discusses her diet, shows her typical routine for preparing a meal, and divulges which meal is the most important of the day.

 

Setting the Table With Dr. Craig Wax and Patricia Scassera, R.D.

As a society, we are consumers. Whether it is wearing the latest fashion or buying the newest technology, we look for the product that is simply the best.

The same holds true in the fitness world. From bodybuilders to casual lifters, it has become a competition to find the best workout supplements in hopes to be molded into the best possible shape. Those in the lifting community try relentlessly to find the best product in order to obtain the big arms, the flat stomach, or the tiny waste seen in magazines. The question that arrises is, are these protein and creatine products really the best thing to put into your body?

Patricia Scasserra, a registered dietitian in the South Jersey area for the past 30 years, says no.

“I think they’re unnecessary and dangerous. People think that they can pump stuff into their bodies without consequence as long as it’s not drugs or something like that. Supplements in large quantities can do the same damage that medications and drugs can.”

Scasserra warns that although protein builds muscle, to be careful not to take an excess amount.

“Too much protein puts an extra load on your kidneys that you don’t really want or need. The best thing for young kids when they’re working out is certainly larger portions of meat, poultry, and cheeses to increase their protein. I would never recommend a protein powder or an excessively high protein diet.”

Although a number of articles have been written about the downsides of protein powders, it is easy to see why it is such an attractive option. Scooping powder, dropping it in water, and shaking it up is easy and fast. It’s quicker than cooking and cheaper in the long run.

Dr. Craig Wax, a Mullica Hill family physician who specializes in everybody and everything,  earned his Bachelor of Science in food science research from Cook College of Rutgers University. Wax says he sees why there is a market for protein powders.

“Protein powders aren’t necessary, but may be helpful for those who don’t take in enough protein as part of their regular diet.”

Wax acknowledges that when trying to make extra gains in size and strength, increasing protein may slightly help. However, he believes that there are better alternatives.

“A diet comprised of water, food that grows from the earth, and daily exercise will serve all populations well,” Wax says.

Food that grows from the earth has its benefits. Eating natural food is not only healthy, but you’re getting all the vitamins and minerals you need in addition to good carbohydrates.  Carbohydrates may be a scary word to hear in the fitness world, but they’re essential.

“Your body needs carbohydrates. Like a car uses gas to run, your body uses carbohydrates,” says Scasserra.

A diet is fundamental to personal health in addition to continuing gains from lifting. Wax says it best:

“The benefits of a healthy diet is a healthy life. You can feel vibrant, you can be well, you might not get sick. You can excel at school, at work, and you can have great relationships with other people. A healthy diet is where it all starts after drinking water.

For more information, Scasserra recommends visiting the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website, www.eatright.org. This is a national organization that dietitians belong to where you can find the most accurate and up-to-date information.